Big Blossom Orphanage*

*This location is undisclosed to help prevent further vandalism and damage to the property.

This mansion was built in the early-1900s for an army corps inspector, his wife and daughters. The house was described has having long draperies which hung from the ceiling to the floors, and the large marble staircase and halls were polished and waxed making them sparkle.

Around 1930, the mansion was bought by a local church who turned it into an orphanage for young girls. Some of the women who lived there when they were younger recall being able to watch television once a week when Disney cartoons were on and crowning a Virgin Mary statue with a wreath made of flowers.

In the late-1950s, it was made into a nursing home for the elderly and has sat vacant since around the 2000s.

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

The interior was confusing, having hallways and rooms which crisscross into one another, sections of the house which were only accessed by one staircase, and small doors built into closets big enough for children but an adult would have to crouch to get through.

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

The children here shared large dormitory rooms. Pipes were installed in the ceiling where drapes could be hung from, giving the kids some sense of privacy. Nowadays, it seems the only people who frequent this floor are neighborhood kids, leaving behind empty beer cans and solo cups.

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Big Blossom Orphanage | Photo © 2016 Bullet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

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