Hilltop Sanatorium*

In the early-20th century, the tuberculosis epidemic was running rampant throughout the Northeastern United States and many cities began taking the initiative and constructed sanatoriums to house and care for the sick patients in the area.

Hilltop Sanatorium was built on a sloped hilltop surrounded by 500 acres of forest. Modeled after southern plantations, the buildings included an Administration building, two patient wings and a dining hall rotunda with a stained glass dome. It was designed with Dr. Rollier’s Method of Heliotherapy in mind which involved treating tuberculosis with fresh air and sunlight, so each floor of the patient wings had wide verandahs to provide patients with fresh open air to sleep in.

As the use of vaccines increased, the need for sanatoriums decreased and by the 1960s, the hospital was no longer used as a tuberculosis hospital. The state used it to treat developmental disabilities until around the mid-90s when it closed its doors for good.

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

Hilltop Sanatorium | Photo © 2016 Bullet, wwwautopsyofarchitecture.com

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