The Fairytale Schoolhouse*

*This location is undisclosed and information here may not be completely true to help prevent further vandalism and damage to the property.

Named after General Pike, a hero of the war of 1812, the town of Pike was established in 1825 with just a handful of people. The first buildings were constructed of hewn logs, including the courthouse which was later replaced with one made of brick. By 1900, the town had grown to a population of over 600 residents, and included a bank, a drug store and a number of businesses that ranged from lumber to shoe repair.

In 1902, a schoolhouse was constructed by a pastor for colored students, who at the time were not allowed to attend the two other schools that were in town. Built near the outskirts of town and down the street from the town cemetery, the school included six classrooms, one bathroom and an auditorium which was also used as a dining hall.

Despite the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964, many places throughout the state of Georgia remained segregated well through the 70s and 80s. Some cities actually saw an increase in segregation as whites abandoned urban residences for new developments in nearby suburban areas. The town of Pike was no different and wouldn’t see desegregation until the late 70s.

The schoolhouse was eventually taken over by the school board and made into an elementary school. It wasn’t long until the school was closed down, merging the current enrollment with their other schools.

Today, the school has since been forgotten, so much that there aren’t even any official records of it ever existing. Still owned by the school board, the surrounding property is used as a bus depot for their school buses. The roof has collapsed in different parts of the school, and one entire classroom has caved in.

The urban explorers in that area have nicknamed it the “Fairytale Schoolhouse” due to the murals throughout the buildings, depicting scenes from various children’s stories. At this rate though, it won’t be long until the schoolhouse is just another tale as well.

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

Fairytale Schoolhouse | Photo © 2015 BUllet, www.autopsyofarchitecture.com

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